DIY_eJuice
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FAQ Friday – Newbie Errors https://ift.tt/2AZVT2D

Common n3wb mistakes

0. Losing track of the days:

I didn't realize today was the day to post this, for example.

1. Mixing by volume:

Technically, we all mix by volume. Any time we use nic, its concentration is measured in mg/ml, so to get accurate and consistent nic levels, we need to know how much volume we're mixing. All calculations are done in terms of volume, but when it comes time to mix, those volumes are converted into weights to allow the quickest, easiest, best form of mixing – using a scale. No need for beakers, for graduated cylinders, or syringes (all of which are not disposable, so annoying) which can cause problems (crosscontamination, inaccurate measurements, etc) just put a empty bottle on the scale and measure individual components one after another. Get a good scale, but the scale you want depends on your market. In 'murica, the AWS501 is preferred, but generally what you want is at least 500g capacity and .01g accuracy. No autoshutoff is also desirable, as is external power rather than batteries.

2. Irrational brand loyalty:

Maybe, just maybe, one could get away with just using FLV concentrates. Until you want blueberry… then the trinity doesn't use any FLV. But really, almost every concentrate made needs help to be great. And no one flavor house has no bad flavors (FLV Crunch Cereal, anyone?), and no one flavor house has the best version of every flavor. Sticking to just TFA or just CAP or just FW or just FA means you'll never make the best version of your concept. In some cases, you won't even be able to make a halfway decent version of it. No matter where you are, there's ways to get multiple manufacturers' flavors.

3. Not doing your homework:

Research flavors before you buy. Just because a flavor is called "cheesecake" that doesn't mean it will taste like something other than foot cheese. There are numerous flavor reviews. Read the ones for any flavor you're thinking of buying, and take notes. Multiple flavors with similar names exist, and if you order from somewhere that has a flavor you don't want but doesn't have the one with a nearly identical name that you do want, you can end up buying the wrong one. Also, INW flavors changed a while back, so reviews may be misleading. Then, once you've ordered… try the flavors. Single flavor tests are important.

4. Trusting too much:

So, you made the mistake of signing up at ELR instead of ATF, that doesn't have to be too bad. But trusting recipes, and then being surprised when that 25% flavor concentrate recipe sucks sweaty donkey balls… well, consider yourself warned. ELR is a repository of recipes from the dark ages of vaping, when insane amounts of flavor were needed. All those old recipes taint the site, skew average use percentages, and give n3wb mixers bad ideas. Don't assume that just because a recipe has been around for years that it will be any good.

5. Not taking every opportunity to learn:

I gotta own this one… when I was starting, all I saw were recipes I'd never mix, and I skipped right past without looking at if there was anything there to learn about technique. If you want (or are basically forced into) come up with original recipes, you need to understand the process, understand what individual flavors do in a mix, and understand how those individual building blocks go together. So even when someone has a repulsive-seeming recipe, read the notes, to learn the process even if you'd never use any of the flavors.

6. Not labeling:

Yeah, it's easy to rebottle something and expect to remember. Once you've got ten or fifteen unlabeled bottles, remembering what all you've rebottled – let alone which is in which bottle – well… not easy. Hockey tape is less than a buck a roll. A sharpie is less than a buck. Throwing something away because you don't know what's in the bottle? Less cheap. Oh, and when you're testing new recipes, put a "open on date" on the bottle. You may forget when you made some batch, you want to make sure you properly steep.

7. Magnetic stirrers:

Nicotine and oxygen do NOT play well with each other. Using a magnetic stirrer will expose all of the nicotine in your mix to oxygen, thus speed the oxygenation process. This will make your nic go bad. There are mechanical aids to help mix, at varying costs: vortexors (lab grade) are not cheap, but ideal; if you cobble something together using a old paint-shaker, that's also damn good; zipties and a sawzall can work well (if you already own a sawzall); or you can make a homemade vortexor (if you're handy… inquire for details). Magnetic stirrers are less useful, and often are heated and associated with…

8. Speed steeping:

Yeah, this doesn't work. Unless your goal is reducing the shelf life of your mix. Don't waste time trying, don't waste money getting anything to try this, and don't waste concentrates trying these so-called 'techniques'. Most of the ideas revolve around boiling off flavor volatiles by heating the juice until those volatiles degrade and/or evaporate. Of course, not only the undesired volatiles escape or degrade… all volatiles will degrade somewhat, and all the lighter volatiles (this includes any citrus, and some other fruits) are prone to escape. If you could accurately break down the chemical composition of a juice that had steeped normally for a month, and the same recipe made just prior to some multi-hour 'speed steeping' attempt, they would NOT be identical.

There's more, I'm sure. Those were just the ones that I know, whether through personal experience or noticing them made repeatedly. If you know of any I forgot to include, let's hear them. (Note: "only buy flavors to make existing recipes" is excluded for the simple reason that for some of us, we could never start mixing because it is next to impossible to find recipes that appeal.)

Common n3wb mistakes0. Losing track of the days:I didn’t realize today was the day to post this, for example.1. Mixing by volume:Technically, we all mix by volume. Any time we use nic, its concentration is measured in mg/ml, so to get accurate and consistent nic levels, we need to know how much volume we’re mixing. All calculations are done in terms of volume, but when it comes time to mix, those volumes are converted into weights to allow the quickest, easiest, best form of mixing – using a scale. No need for beakers, for graduated cylinders, or syringes (all of which are not disposable, so annoying) which can cause problems (crosscontamination, inaccurate measurements, etc) just put a empty bottle on the scale and measure individual components one after another. Get a good scale, but the scale you want depends on your market. In ‘murica, the AWS501 is preferred, but generally what you want is at least 500g capacity and .01g accuracy. No autoshutoff is also desirable, as is external power rather than batteries.2. Irrational brand loyalty:Maybe, just maybe, one could get away with just using FLV concentrates. Until you want blueberry… then the trinity doesn’t use any FLV. But really, almost every concentrate made needs help to be great. And no one flavor house has no bad flavors (FLV Crunch Cereal, anyone?), and no one flavor house has the best version of every flavor. Sticking to just TFA or just CAP or just FW or just FA means you’ll never make the best version of your concept. In some cases, you won’t even be able to make a halfway decent version of it. No matter where you are, there’s ways to get multiple manufacturers’ flavors.3. Not doing your homework:Research flavors before you buy. Just because a flavor is called “cheesecake” that doesn’t mean it will taste like something other than foot cheese. There are numerous flavor reviews. Read the ones for any flavor you’re thinking of buying, and take notes. Multiple flavors with similar names exist, and if you order from somewhere that has a flavor you don’t want but doesn’t have the one with a nearly identical name that you do want, you can end up buying the wrong one. Also, INW flavors changed a while back, so reviews may be misleading. Then, once you’ve ordered… try the flavors. Single flavor tests are important.4. Trusting too much:So, you made the mistake of signing up at ELR instead of ATF, that doesn’t have to be too bad. But trusting recipes, and then being surprised when that 25% flavor concentrate recipe sucks sweaty donkey balls… well, consider yourself warned. ELR is a repository of recipes from the dark ages of vaping, when insane amounts of flavor were needed. All those old recipes taint the site, skew average use percentages, and give n3wb mixers bad ideas. Don’t assume that just because a recipe has been around for years that it will be any good.5. Not taking every opportunity to learn:I gotta own this one… when I was starting, all I saw were recipes I’d never mix, and I skipped right past without looking at if there was anything there to learn about technique. If you want (or are basically forced into) come up with original recipes, you need to understand the process, understand what individual flavors do in a mix, and understand how those individual building blocks go together. So even when someone has a repulsive-seeming recipe, read the notes, to learn the process even if you’d never use any of the flavors.6. Not labeling:Yeah, it’s easy to rebottle something and expect to remember. Once you’ve got ten or fifteen unlabeled bottles, remembering what all you’ve rebottled – let alone which is in which bottle – well… not easy. Hockey tape is less than a buck a roll. A sharpie is less than a buck. Throwing something away because you don’t know what’s in the bottle? Less cheap. Oh, and when you’re testing new recipes, put a “open on date” on the bottle. You may forget when you made some batch, you want to make sure you properly steep.7. Magnetic stirrers:Nicotine and oxygen do NOT play well with each other. Using a magnetic stirrer will expose all of the nicotine in your mix to oxygen, thus speed the oxygenation process. This will make your nic go bad. There are mechanical aids to help mix, at varying costs: vortexors (lab grade) are not cheap, but ideal; if you cobble something together using a old paint-shaker, that’s also damn good; zipties and a sawzall can work well (if you already own a sawzall); or you can make a homemade vortexor (if you’re handy… inquire for details). Magnetic stirrers are less useful, and often are heated and associated with…8. Speed steeping:Yeah, this doesn’t work. Unless your goal is reducing the shelf life of your mix. Don’t waste time trying, don’t waste money getting anything to try this, and don’t waste concentrates trying these so-called ‘techniques’. Most of the ideas revolve around boiling off flavor volatiles by heating the juice until those volatiles degrade and/or evaporate. Of course, not only the undesired volatiles escape or degrade… all volatiles will degrade somewhat, and all the lighter volatiles (this includes any citrus, and some other fruits) are prone to escape. If you could accurately break down the chemical composition of a juice that had steeped normally for a month, and the same recipe made just prior to some multi-hour ‘speed steeping’ attempt, they would NOT be identical.There’s more, I’m sure. Those were just the ones that I know, whether through personal experience or noticing them made repeatedly. If you know of any I forgot to include, let’s hear them. (Note: “only buy flavors to make existing recipes” is excluded for the simple reason that for some of us, we could never start mixing because it is next to impossible to find recipes that appeal.)

Submitted August 11, 2018 at 12:20AM by juthinc
via reddit https://ift.tt/2M9hmLX}

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