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Tested: Smoant Charon Mini! Power performance, USB charging, low cell cut-off and dismantle / build quality check https://ift.tt/2A2EKTn

Intro:

Well, I’m waaaay late to get this test done! So late in fact that Smoants new Naboo mod is already out. Since the Naboo appears to have a similar display and possibly board, the results here for the Charon Mini may also apply. I’ll confirm that at a later date if I get one to test. Anyway, I hope this information is still of use for current owners and those looking at buying a Charon Mini.

Random product pics.

The first thing you’ll notice about the Charon Mini apart from the honking big colour screen is that it looks absolutely nothing like the original Charon and isn’t particularly mini. Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing! While the OG Charon was a solid and well recommended device, I always felt like it was bigger than it needed to be. The Charon Mini isn’t really a true “mini” – such as a single cell or internal cell version of the original, but it is smaller and more pocket friendly. There’s not much to compare with its older brother really. The shape is relatively boxy but with nicely rounded corners it does feel a lot better in the hand than mods with sharp edges. I find it very comfortable to hold. The screen takes up the majority of the front panel, while the rear magnetic battery door has a colour pattern on it. I wasn’t into it when I first opened the box to be honest but it’s kinda grown on me. Overall I’ve enjoyed using it – I like the graphics and the paint / front plastic has held up quite well to scratches. I haven’t had any usage or quality issues with this device while using it as a daily.

That’s about it for normal review stuff, this post is all about the technical stuff you may want to know about this device. Feel free to skip to the TL;DR’s in bold or ask questions if something is unclear. I’ll be covering the USB charge function, DC converter performance, battery management (low cell cut off and standby draw) as well as a full dismantle and opinion on build quality. I won’t be going into all the menu functions and whatnot, you’re probably better off checking out your preferred YouTube reviewer for that.

Before we get into the data, I really want to give Smoant’s company rep Kato a big shout out here – I’ve been really impressed by his attitude and ethics. I’ll explain why and hopefully he doesn’t mind, it’s a great reflection on him and Smoant anyhow. I figured you guys might be interested to hear.

Firstly, when I get offered a device to test, I always make it clear that the reports I post will show everything good and bad about the device – with the caveat that if I think the device has a genuine problem (like being a faulty unit) I’d get in contact with them before publicly bagging it. I think that’s fair for everyone involved. I’d honestly have no problems with a company changing their minds about sending me a product at this point – I mean, I’m not sure how keen I’d be to send my own product to some smartass who’s potentially going to pick apart the performance of it. The reply from Kato was something like “We know the kinds of tests you do and we’re cool with that. We don’t want to make poor products so if there are things we can improve, we want to know about it”. I think that’s awesome. That’s already more meaningful communication than what you normally get talking directly to vape companies to be honest.

Next after receiving the device and using it for a few days, I noticed it wasn’t updating the battery meter down from 4 out of 5 bars until it was dead empty. No bueno, it was basically impossible to tell what charge remaining you had. I got in contact with Kato to let him know what was going on and some brief cell voltage vs meter testing data. I received a reply almost immediately with a promise to talk to the engineers and just a few days later I was sent an updated firmware which fixed the problem. I’d only just confirmed the meter was behaving much better a few days after that when I was sent another firmware which was improved further as Kato or the engineers still felt it wasn’t good enough. Obviously it’s in their best interest to have something basic like the battery meter working correctly, but I’m still super impressed that Kato and the guys at Smoant got it sorted pronto and with great communication.

At no point did Kato ask me to not report on the issue.

Good stuff.

 


 

USB charge performance:

All testing graphs

Charging cycles were ran and logged for USB input current, cell current and maximum voltages both with cells starting balanced and then 0.3V apart. A final worst-case-scenario test was done with one cell fully charged and the other empty.

It initially looked like the charge circuit had been upgraded from the original Charon, it’s now a clean constant-current then constant voltage operation with a proper cycle termination at around 150mA. It does not float charge like a fair number of mods do, but it also does not share the USB power to run the board standby. This means that after the cycle terminates, the board standby current causes a slow discharge and subsequent triggering of the circuit to top them up some time later once they hit the auto-recharge threshold. These recharges occur more regularly with old or low capacity cells. It’s not a worry for safety, but it would be better if the board standby was powered by the USB instead of the cells, or if the board went into full low current standby after the cycle had finished. Note that not many boards including the DNA 200 and 250 have the ability to power the standby current from USB and show a similar behaviour after a cycle. It’s not a big deal and I’ll always recommend any devices to be unplugged shortly after full anyway. This includes removing cells from external chargers.

Things take a turn south when it comes to the balancing function unfortunately. In normal use with matched cells all is fine – the voltage accuracy was really good with maximums at between 4.195 and 4.205V but while I recorded a peak of 75mA current flow through the balance wire showing the circuit does have a balance function, it does quite a poor job of balancing mismatched cells. It’ll allow the high cell in an unbalanced pair to rise up above the recommended 4.20V, to a peak of 4.38V. This won’t happen when you’re using good matched cells starting off at the same level but regardless it’s serious points off here. A device shouldn’t ever allow a single cell to rise above 4.20V – it has to account for the scenario where a user might accidentally install mismatched cells. Is this dangerous? I don’t think so as the high levels are only present for a few seconds at a time in pulses, but I’d have to say it’s not good for the cells. Disappointing to see.

Running some consecutive charge and discharge cycles with a normal matched set of cells, maximum voltages stayed right around the 4.20V mark.

The switching DC converter for the charge function has a very high efficiency, at approximately 84.5%.

Maximum charge current was 1.024A and maximum USB input current was 1.710A.

The highest temperature during charging was fine at 74.7degC / 166degF at the hottest spot on the board I could find. This is fine.

USB charge TL;DR:

It’s pretty good under normal conditions with matched cells – it performs a proper cut-off with voltages and currents all normal. My model however did not handle cells starting off unbalanced well, and pushed the high cell up too far. This should not happen. If you’re using the USB charge function, be careful not to accidentally put in one full cell with one empty cell.

 


 

DC converter performance:

Spreadsheet of all testing data

Tested in this section:

  • Current limit

  • Voltage limit

  • Maximum wattage

  • Resistance accuracy

  • “Overhead” or how close the atomiser output voltage can be to the cell input voltage (more on this later)

  • Efficiency

  • Converter type (buck-boost or buck only)

  • Maximum wattages at certain resistance ranges

The last one is particularly useful as depending on the build or coil resistance you like to use, you may or may not be able to achieve the wattage you like. You’d think a series dual cell mod with a high wattage limit would have all the power you’d need, but it’s not necessarily so. For example, I like to use dual single-core claptons in my Boreas RTA. At around 0.46ohm, devices that can’t boost the output voltage above the cell voltage probably won’t be able to give me the 80-90W that I want. Also, if a device has a low current limit and you run a very low build, you may also be unable to get the wattage you want. This achievable wattage vs resistance section aims to answer that.

Voltage limit:

This is a bit of a tricky one to put a number on. Since the Charon does not have a boost converter, the maximum output voltage will drop as the cells drop. Not just with how charged they are either, the higher the wattage is turned up, the more the cells will sag and thus also limit the output. The absolute maximum I could achieve was 7.310V with a 1.4ohm resistance and fully charged batteries.

Current limit:

I didn’t really see a current limit in effect as the Charon Mini was able to achieve the full rated wattage with a 0.11ohm resistance. This resulted in the maximum output current I saw, at 43.75A.

Maximum wattage:

I was able to achieve 219.6W – the advertised 220W of the device is accurate. At this level though, the cell current draw is a whopping 40.7A – far above the CDR of any 18650 available. This is an interesting point for those who say “regulated mods will protect you from doing anything dangerous” – they will not. You absolutely still need to limit yourself to a wattage suitable for the cells you are using. As a rough guide, aim for a maximum of about 65W per cell for good 20A CDR cells.

Resistance accuracy:

I’d say the resistance accuracy on this device is excellent. In most cases it’s around 3% or better. Refer to test chart for specifics.

Efficiency:

Pretty good, ranging from 85% up to around 95% depending on build resistance and output vs input voltage. It seemed to do better when outputting a voltage close to the input such as using a higher resistance (0.3 and up) coil at a medium to high wattage setting.

Output voltage “overhead”:

The minimum difference between the voltage into the board versus what it could output was around 0.7V. That means, the output cannot be the same as what the cells are at, it’ll always be at least 0.7V lower. This is not exactly loss – that 0.7V is not wasted – it’s just due to how the converter itself works. I’m not sure how this compares to other mods at this time.

Maximum wattages versus build resistance:

This one is tricky to put specific numbers on as it depends on your battery quality and charge level. I was seeing maximums of around 61W with a 0.8ohm coil, 85W with a 0.53ohm coil and 125W with a 0.31ohm coil, all with cells well over half charge. These maximums will drop further with lower battery charge.

  • Max. voltage: 7.31V (1.4ohm coil, fully charged cells)

  • Max. current: 43.75A (0.11ohm coil)

  • Max. wattage: 219.6W

  • Resistance accuracy: Normally within 3% of actual (very good)

  • Efficiency: Approx. 85 to 95% depending on build and power setting

  • Converter type: Buck-only (output must be at least 0.7V less than battery)

  • Output voltage overhead: 0.7V

  • Maximum wattages versus build resistance: Approx. 61W / 0.8ohm, 85W / 0.53ohm, 125W / 0.31ohm

DC converter performance TL;DR:

All looks good. Efficiency and resistance accuracy are great. Buck-only converter means you might struggle to get a high power output without using a low resistance (less than 0.3ohm) build but this is fairly normal for dual cell mods and probably won’t bother most users.

 


 

Low cell cut-off and standby draw:

Both of these were a bit of a sore point with the original Charon – the high cut-off didn’t allow for the best battery life and the standby draw was also too high.

On the Charon Mini the low cell cut off is a lot lower, I measured a series voltage of 6.23V so let’s say about 3.1V per cell. Much better!

The standby current is also better but still not ideal. I measured 25.95mA while the board is active and for 10 minutes after the last button press, and 0.46mA when on full standby. We saw the the Geekvape Aegis Legend on the original firmware was wasting a fair bit of battery power with this long 10 minute active standby – a similar thing is going on with the Charon Mini but to a lesser degree as the draw is about a third as much. The full standby or deep sleep mode at 0.46mA is also not as good as many other mods that drop right down to microamps but a lot better than the original Charon. A level of 0.46mA is what I would consider insignificant in daily use but could fully discharge a set of cells if the mod was left in storage. You shouldn’t ever be leaving cells in a mod unused long term but if you did, it would take about 3 months for a fully charged set to drop down to empty.

 


 

Build Quality:

Dismantle Album here.

Overall I like the design and the build quality is very good. It’s an interesting design in that the board itself is integral to the structure of the device. Those battery polarity markings in the sled appear to be part of the plastic but in fact they’re strip stickers directly on the board. The lower two battery contacts are soldered directly onto the board which I think is great – it really cuts down on the wiring and associated voltage drop / power loss. It also simplifies the assembly. Hand soldered parts such as the 510 were clean and neat and that lovely big screen is supported by a plastic frame which is attached to the board.

The board is also very clean and components are well laid out. I didn’t spot any component solder defects.

The main power mosfets used in this device are Alpha and Omega brand 6382 N-channel x 3 – datasheet. I like that they didn’t scrub the part numbers off like a lot of manufacturers do.

The main microprocessor is a Holtek HT32F52352. This microcontroller has a “32-Bit Arm® Cortex®-M0+ MCU” processor core.

Unfortunately, there is no conformal coating on the board – it’s bone dry. The case is not sealed to juice ingress either so as with any device not specifically waterproof or IP rated, be careful with juice spills.

The USB socket arrangement is my least favourite – it’s mounted at a 90 degree to the board and is only supported with 2 solder tags. Boo. If you use USB charging regularly on this device be careful to limit flexing of the socket as much as possible.

The fire switch is also mounted at a 90 degree to the main board on a tiny sub-board. I’m not a huge fan of this but it seems well supported by the plastic sled piece behind it. The Vaporesso Revenger also has this arrangement and does not seem to suffer from failures as far as I know.

Build Quality TL;DR:

Intelligently thought out design with integrated battery contacts. My unit was clean and well assembled. USB socket mounting is not strong – be careful. No conformal coating on the board and the case is not sealed – be careful to limit juice spills (as always).

 


 

Overall TL;DR:

Internal build design and quality is good but be careful with juice spills and the USB socket. USB charging function is fine in normal use but poor with mismatched cells. DC converter performed very well (buck only, use low resistance builds for high power output) and reads resistance accurately. Low cell cut-off is better than the original Charon at 3.1V/cell. Standby current is also better but still has some room for improvement. It would take around 3 months for the Charon Mini to discharge a fully charged set of cells so make sure to take them out if storing the mod.

 

Cheers!

~Vapey

Instagram: @vapeymcgyver

Email: vapey.mcgyver@gmail.com

 


 

IMPORTANT NOTE / DISCLAIMER!! All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy HOWEVER no claims are made that these numbers, opinions or results are 100% correct. Mistakes may have been made. USB charge at your own risk. It is always good practice to monitor any charging system and unplug shortly after full charge. This information refers to the tested operation alone in a properly working device – it is impossible to give an estimation of reliability or outcome in the event of a faulty device.

Intro:Well, I’m waaaay late to get this test done! So late in fact that Smoants new Naboo mod is already out. Since the Naboo appears to have a similar display and possibly board, the results here for the Charon Mini may also apply. I’ll confirm that at a later date if I get one to test. Anyway, I hope this information is still of use for current owners and those looking at buying a Charon Mini.Random product pics.The first thing you’ll notice about the Charon Mini apart from the honking big colour screen is that it looks absolutely nothing like the original Charon and isn’t particularly mini. Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing! While the OG Charon was a solid and well recommended device, I always felt like it was bigger than it needed to be. The Charon Mini isn’t really a true “mini” – such as a single cell or internal cell version of the original, but it is smaller and more pocket friendly. There’s not much to compare with its older brother really. The shape is relatively boxy but with nicely rounded corners it does feel a lot better in the hand than mods with sharp edges. I find it very comfortable to hold. The screen takes up the majority of the front panel, while the rear magnetic battery door has a colour pattern on it. I wasn’t into it when I first opened the box to be honest but it’s kinda grown on me. Overall I’ve enjoyed using it – I like the graphics and the paint / front plastic has held up quite well to scratches. I haven’t had any usage or quality issues with this device while using it as a daily.That’s about it for normal review stuff, this post is all about the technical stuff you may want to know about this device. Feel free to skip to the TL;DR’s in bold or ask questions if something is unclear. I’ll be covering the USB charge function, DC converter performance, battery management (low cell cut off and standby draw) as well as a full dismantle and opinion on build quality. I won’t be going into all the menu functions and whatnot, you’re probably better off checking out your preferred YouTube reviewer for that.Before we get into the data, I really want to give Smoant’s company rep Kato a big shout out here – I’ve been really impressed by his attitude and ethics. I’ll explain why and hopefully he doesn’t mind, it’s a great reflection on him and Smoant anyhow. I figured you guys might be interested to hear.Firstly, when I get offered a device to test, I always make it clear that the reports I post will show everything good and bad about the device – with the caveat that if I think the device has a genuine problem (like being a faulty unit) I’d get in contact with them before publicly bagging it. I think that’s fair for everyone involved. I’d honestly have no problems with a company changing their minds about sending me a product at this point – I mean, I’m not sure how keen I’d be to send my own product to some smartass who’s potentially going to pick apart the performance of it. The reply from Kato was something like “We know the kinds of tests you do and we’re cool with that. We don’t want to make poor products so if there are things we can improve, we want to know about it”. I think that’s awesome. That’s already more meaningful communication than what you normally get talking directly to vape companies to be honest.Next after receiving the device and using it for a few days, I noticed it wasn’t updating the battery meter down from 4 out of 5 bars until it was dead empty. No bueno, it was basically impossible to tell what charge remaining you had. I got in contact with Kato to let him know what was going on and some brief cell voltage vs meter testing data. I received a reply almost immediately with a promise to talk to the engineers and just a few days later I was sent an updated firmware which fixed the problem. I’d only just confirmed the meter was behaving much better a few days after that when I was sent another firmware which was improved further as Kato or the engineers still felt it wasn’t good enough. Obviously it’s in their best interest to have something basic like the battery meter working correctly, but I’m still super impressed that Kato and the guys at Smoant got it sorted pronto and with great communication.At no point did Kato ask me to not report on the issue.Good stuff.  USB charge performance:All testing graphsCharging cycles were ran and logged for USB input current, cell current and maximum voltages both with cells starting balanced and then 0.3V apart. A final worst-case-scenario test was done with one cell fully charged and the other empty.It initially looked like the charge circuit had been upgraded from the original Charon, it’s now a clean constant-current then constant voltage operation with a proper cycle termination at around 150mA. It does not float charge like a fair number of mods do, but it also does not share the USB power to run the board standby. This means that after the cycle terminates, the board standby current causes a slow discharge and subsequent triggering of the circuit to top them up some time later once they hit the auto-recharge threshold. These recharges occur more regularly with old or low capacity cells. It’s not a worry for safety, but it would be better if the board standby was powered by the USB instead of the cells, or if the board went into full low current standby after the cycle had finished. Note that not many boards including the DNA 200 and 250 have the ability to power the standby current from USB and show a similar behaviour after a cycle. It’s not a big deal and I’ll always recommend any devices to be unplugged shortly after full anyway. This includes removing cells from external chargers.Things take a turn south when it comes to the balancing function unfortunately. In normal use with matched cells all is fine – the voltage accuracy was really good with maximums at between 4.195 and 4.205V but while I recorded a peak of 75mA current flow through the balance wire showing the circuit does have a balance function, it does quite a poor job of balancing mismatched cells. It’ll allow the high cell in an unbalanced pair to rise up above the recommended 4.20V, to a peak of 4.38V. This won’t happen when you’re using good matched cells starting off at the same level but regardless it’s serious points off here. A device shouldn’t ever allow a single cell to rise above 4.20V – it has to account for the scenario where a user might accidentally install mismatched cells. Is this dangerous? I don’t think so as the high levels are only present for a few seconds at a time in pulses, but I’d have to say it’s not good for the cells. Disappointing to see.Running some consecutive charge and discharge cycles with a normal matched set of cells, maximum voltages stayed right around the 4.20V mark.The switching DC converter for the charge function has a very high efficiency, at approximately 84.5%.Maximum charge current was 1.024A and maximum USB input current was 1.710A.The highest temperature during charging was fine at 74.7degC / 166degF at the hottest spot on the board I could find. This is fine.USB charge TL;DR:It’s pretty good under normal conditions with matched cells – it performs a proper cut-off with voltages and currents all normal. My model however did not handle cells starting off unbalanced well, and pushed the high cell up too far. This should not happen. If you’re using the USB charge function, be careful not to accidentally put in one full cell with one empty cell.  DC converter performance:Spreadsheet of all testing dataTested in this section:Current limitVoltage limitMaximum wattageResistance accuracy“Overhead” or how close the atomiser output voltage can be to the cell input voltage (more on this later)EfficiencyConverter type (buck-boost or buck only)Maximum wattages at certain resistance rangesThe last one is particularly useful as depending on the build or coil resistance you like to use, you may or may not be able to achieve the wattage you like. You’d think a series dual cell mod with a high wattage limit would have all the power you’d need, but it’s not necessarily so. For example, I like to use dual single-core claptons in my Boreas RTA. At around 0.46ohm, devices that can’t boost the output voltage above the cell voltage probably won’t be able to give me the 80-90W that I want. Also, if a device has a low current limit and you run a very low build, you may also be unable to get the wattage you want. This achievable wattage vs resistance section aims to answer that.Voltage limit:This is a bit of a tricky one to put a number on. Since the Charon does not have a boost converter, the maximum output voltage will drop as the cells drop. Not just with how charged they are either, the higher the wattage is turned up, the more the cells will sag and thus also limit the output. The absolute maximum I could achieve was 7.310V with a 1.4ohm resistance and fully charged batteries.Current limit:I didn’t really see a current limit in effect as the Charon Mini was able to achieve the full rated wattage with a 0.11ohm resistance. This resulted in the maximum output current I saw, at 43.75A.Maximum wattage:I was able to achieve 219.6W – the advertised 220W of the device is accurate. At this level though, the cell current draw is a whopping 40.7A – far above the CDR of any 18650 available. This is an interesting point for those who say “regulated mods will protect you from doing anything dangerous” – they will not. You absolutely still need to limit yourself to a wattage suitable for the cells you are using. As a rough guide, aim for a maximum of about 65W per cell for good 20A CDR cells.Resistance accuracy:I’d say the resistance accuracy on this device is excellent. In most cases it’s around 3% or better. Refer to test chart for specifics.Efficiency:Pretty good, ranging from 85% up to around 95% depending on build resistance and output vs input voltage. It seemed to do better when outputting a voltage close to the input such as using a higher resistance (0.3 and up) coil at a medium to high wattage setting.Output voltage “overhead”:The minimum difference between the voltage into the board versus what it could output was around 0.7V. That means, the output cannot be the same as what the cells are at, it’ll always be at least 0.7V lower. This is not exactly loss – that 0.7V is not wasted – it’s just due to how the converter itself works. I’m not sure how this compares to other mods at this time.Maximum wattages versus build resistance:This one is tricky to put specific numbers on as it depends on your battery quality and charge level. I was seeing maximums of around 61W with a 0.8ohm coil, 85W with a 0.53ohm coil and 125W with a 0.31ohm coil, all with cells well over half charge. These maximums will drop further with lower battery charge.Max. voltage: 7.31V (1.4ohm coil, fully charged cells)Max. current: 43.75A (0.11ohm coil)Max. wattage: 219.6WResistance accuracy: Normally within 3% of actual (very good)Efficiency: Approx. 85 to 95% depending on build and power settingConverter type: Buck-only (output must be at least 0.7V less than battery)Output voltage overhead: 0.7VMaximum wattages versus build resistance: Approx. 61W / 0.8ohm, 85W / 0.53ohm, 125W / 0.31ohmDC converter performance TL;DR:All looks good. Efficiency and resistance accuracy are great. Buck-only converter means you might struggle to get a high power output without using a low resistance (less than 0.3ohm) build but this is fairly normal for dual cell mods and probably won’t bother most users.  Low cell cut-off and standby draw:Both of these were a bit of a sore point with the original Charon – the high cut-off didn’t allow for the best battery life and the standby draw was also too high.On the Charon Mini the low cell cut off is a lot lower, I measured a series voltage of 6.23V so let’s say about 3.1V per cell. Much better!The standby current is also better but still not ideal. I measured 25.95mA while the board is active and for 10 minutes after the last button press, and 0.46mA when on full standby. We saw the the Geekvape Aegis Legend on the original firmware was wasting a fair bit of battery power with this long 10 minute active standby – a similar thing is going on with the Charon Mini but to a lesser degree as the draw is about a third as much. The full standby or deep sleep mode at 0.46mA is also not as good as many other mods that drop right down to microamps but a lot better than the original Charon. A level of 0.46mA is what I would consider insignificant in daily use but could fully discharge a set of cells if the mod was left in storage. You shouldn’t ever be leaving cells in a mod unused long term but if you did, it would take about 3 months for a fully charged set to drop down to empty.  Build Quality:Dismantle Album here.Overall I like the design and the build quality is very good. It’s an interesting design in that the board itself is integral to the structure of the device. Those battery polarity markings in the sled appear to be part of the plastic but in fact they’re strip stickers directly on the board. The lower two battery contacts are soldered directly onto the board which I think is great – it really cuts down on the wiring and associated voltage drop / power loss. It also simplifies the assembly. Hand soldered parts such as the 510 were clean and neat and that lovely big screen is supported by a plastic frame which is attached to the board.The board is also very clean and components are well laid out. I didn’t spot any component solder defects.The main power mosfets used in this device are Alpha and Omega brand 6382 N-channel x 3 – datasheet. I like that they didn’t scrub the part numbers off like a lot of manufacturers do.The main microprocessor is a Holtek HT32F52352. This microcontroller has a “32-Bit Arm® Cortex®-M0+ MCU” processor core.Unfortunately, there is no conformal coating on the board – it’s bone dry. The case is not sealed to juice ingress either so as with any device not specifically waterproof or IP rated, be careful with juice spills.The USB socket arrangement is my least favourite – it’s mounted at a 90 degree to the board and is only supported with 2 solder tags. Boo. If you use USB charging regularly on this device be careful to limit flexing of the socket as much as possible.The fire switch is also mounted at a 90 degree to the main board on a tiny sub-board. I’m not a huge fan of this but it seems well supported by the plastic sled piece behind it. The Vaporesso Revenger also has this arrangement and does not seem to suffer from failures as far as I know.Build Quality TL;DR:Intelligently thought out design with integrated battery contacts. My unit was clean and well assembled. USB socket mounting is not strong – be careful. No conformal coating on the board and the case is not sealed – be careful to limit juice spills (as always).  Overall TL;DR:Internal build design and quality is good but be careful with juice spills and the USB socket. USB charging function is fine in normal use but poor with mismatched cells. DC converter performed very well (buck only, use low resistance builds for high power output) and reads resistance accurately. Low cell cut-off is better than the original Charon at 3.1V/cell. Standby current is also better but still has some room for improvement. It would take around 3 months for the Charon Mini to discharge a fully charged set of cells so make sure to take them out if storing the mod. Cheers!~VapeyInstagram: @vapeymcgyverEmail: vapey.mcgyver@gmail.com  IMPORTANT NOTE / DISCLAIMER!! All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy HOWEVER no claims are made that these numbers, opinions or results are 100% correct. Mistakes may have been made. USB charge at your own risk. It is always good practice to monitor any charging system and unplug shortly after full charge. This information refers to the tested operation alone in a properly working device – it is impossible to give an estimation of reliability or outcome in the event of a faulty device.

Submitted October 10, 2018 at 03:18PM by VapeyMcGyver
via reddit https://ift.tt/2pLprIQ}

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