DIY_eJuice
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DIY First Order (on a Budget) https://ift.tt/2C7oMcm

First Order Flavors

Why DIY?:

https://www.reddit.com/r/DIY_eJuice/comments/8ss9rw/throwback_thursday_why_diy/

Even though this has been covered before, it’s still very important to know why you want to get started making your own juice. Getting into DIY ejuice is a challenge different from trying to find your first all day vape. When buying commercial juices, there are loads of resources (juicedb.com, Brick and Mortar stores, friendly vapers willing to make a suggestion, etc) for you to get a good enough guess of what brand or profile of a vape you would like. For me, my first five or six good vapes were directly recommended by my BnM store keeper who got to know what I liked and had some idea of what the juices were that had been well received. One of the advantages of knowing what you like means that you can start to recreate that for yourself using DIY concentrates. Some people are flavor chasers and like to try something new as often as possible. These types of vapers can enjoy diy more than most because they can switch up their vapes, or recipes, as often as they’d like and constantly tweak the flavors they have. And then there’s the money. And here’s the rub, when you buy a commercial juice, you’re paying as much (if not more) for the advertising/marketing as you are for the work that went into the recipe. I found there were more than a few ‘premium’ brands I just didn’t enjoy vaping (too sweet, not enough this, too much that, I wish they had used X fruit instead of Y, etc.) just as there were ones that were obscure that I just really enjoyed hitting for a month or so.

So, what’s the take-away? People diy for many different reasons. If you are looking for something specific (apple fritter, milkshake, something cheap and vapable, jelly filled donuts, vanilla cigar, lemonade etc.) or if you are just in it for the exciting hobbyist adventure, you need somewhere to start. And that’s Your First Order.

First Order Pitfalls/Advice: https://www.reddit.com/r/DIY_eJuice/comments/8xzs0d/my_first_order_project_update_2_community_survey/

https://www.reddit.com/r/DIY_eJuice/wiki/first_order_flavors

https://www.reddit.com/r/DIY_eJuice/comments/8wfwnl/throwback_thursday_first_order_flavors/

What many of us did wasn’t the best way to start. We chose based on the name of the flavor. We chose based on what was available from one vendor or website. We chose because we wanted to make a ‘cappuccino apple banana waffle with cherries on top’ vape and got 12 different concentrates to make it and — wouldn’t you know — it came out unvapable. I can personally attest to vaping some horrendous vapes because I paid for it and I mixed it and I was going to vape through my mistakes.

Some things to remember when you first start looking at flavors:

  1. Flavors do not have to taste like their name.
  2. Flavors can and will change (that’s the good part) when mixed with other flavors, sometimes in unpredictable ways.
  3. Taste is subjective.

What do each of these mean for the new mixer?

  1. Research helps in choosing which flavors to buy or to avoid (here’s looking at you TPA Honey!).
  2. Researching recipes (alltheflavors, e-liquidrecipes, etc) and finding ones that sound like a profile you enjoy, come highly rated, and aren’t too complex.
  3. Even with all this work, you may not like something!

So you checked out the First Order Flavors recommendation list. You picked out some recipes that you want to try. You put all this together and drop a month’s worth of juice money on starting up (and then some) and whammo! Your juice sucks. WTF?!? A few things worth noting:

  1. Commercial juice has a fuck ton of sweetener in it. Your new mixes will have way less even if there’s some CAP Super Sweet in the recipe you used. It will take your taste buds some time to adjust.
  2. Steeping is real. Some recipes advertised as SnV (Shake and vape) really improve with some time. It will take you a bit to ‘get ahead’ and mix larger batches with confidence you will have your go to for nicotine while you are mixing to create/experiment. Patience is going to be your best friend on this journey.
  3. You just might not like something. Many of the ‘best’ recipes never really tickled my fancy. But mixing them did teach me how a flavor could be used to produce a certain result. The good news is that this here bottle of Mustard Milk that never quite did it for me might get a dash of raspberry in it or, next time, exclusively some other kind of fruit to see if I can replace the strawberry with mango lychee and Whammo! I’m off to the wide world of diy! The world is my proverbial oyster.

My First Order Suggestions:

Keeping all this in mind seems contradictory. So how to go about buying in when flavor is subjective and many highly rated recipes are complex or have some rare flavor in them? The over arching suggestion I give people is to start small. I think this helps on a few levels and still makes it difficult too.

Let’s start with the difficulties…

I still don’t know what to buy. Ok. Take a breath. Remember, taste is subjective, but the Your First Order list is going to have many flavors that are widely used in recipes. That makes them versatile so you may find them useful in a few recipes, but also you may find yourself using them in very different ways later on. So you are really just taking a chance on a flavor and that is really what makes this exciting as much as it makes it frustrating. Solution: make sure the flavors you buy first directly relate to a recipe you are going to mix. Very important.

I want to buy it all. Response: you can’t. You wont. And you will go broke trying. Set a budget. Diy generally pays off in at least two months. I suggest you set aside a two month juice budget for your first order. Commit to vaping your old commercial juice when your new juices are either steeping or just not cutting it for you. If you get that “this isn’t so bad” feel from something you’ve made, then — Whammo! – you should have the diy bug by then because the price point comparison is too good to be true. But, it is! You are now on the road to $1/30ml ejuice 4lyfe and you may even start selling some at a modest cost to friends to cover buying new concentrates. Who knows?

Buying in on a Budget:

You say, “Ok, sure. I’m sold on this promise of wonderful flavor, but I want to start small.” I say, “Great! This will actually increase your chances of success, despite the frustration of not having 1 zillion flavors in your arsenal to start.” You ask, “What do you mean?” Let me explain…

Having a zillion flavors is a curse and a blessing. DIY is tricky because you really have to get to know your flavors. Like, all their secrets. It takes time vaping them. Mixing at different percentages. Different wattages. ARRRGHHH!!! Too many variables! Ok, settle down. Buying in on a budget is a great way to get to know your flavors while producing something vapable, but at a lower initial cost. Specifically with the initial buy in cost of pg, vg, nicotine, bottles, and a scale. Now here’s where things get tricky. Which of these can you do without? Really, none of them is it recommended to do without. But there are actually ways around them if you are on a shoestring budget, ways to offset the cost if you are on a moderate budget, and ways to really spend all your juice money for the year if you’re not careful.

Here are some money saving tips:

  1. You will want a million bottles eventually. Tip: save all your glass bottles starting now. You can wash these out and relabel them later with some masking tape. The flavor will come out. I even used some plastic bottles by only mixing new juices in them that fit the same or similar profile. Not ideal, but you’ve already bought them. Just rinse them out with warm water, let them air dry and then expect some lingering aroma in the plastics.
  2. Buy wisely. Meaning, there’s a sweet spot with your order that will get you free shipping with Nicriver, vaperstek, bullcityflavors, etc. But with nicriver, you can get your flavors and pg/vg/nic all in one shot. If you are starting small enough with flavors, then you will be fine. If you are extra patient, you can wait for a sale and save 20%. Major holidays are generally when those happen. Join their email lists.
  3. Consider taking a chance on some Stand Alone flavors.

I do NOT recommend against saving money by NOT buying a scale. Measuring by weight is the easiest and very accurate way of making mixes. You want to be able to reproduce your results or avoid them if you didn’t like the results. 1%, heck, even 0.5% can make a juice go south depending on the flavor. For this reason, I recommend buying in on the scale from day 1 as well as only using flavors that are forgiving at higher percentages. A small mess up here and there will not make a huge difference in taste or quality that way.

Stand Alone Flavors:

Here is where the community is a massive wonderful resource. Yes, taste is subjective, but you’ve accepted the risk of trying some things and you have done your research on the flavors themselves, so here’s some links to threads where people have found that a flavor concentrate (or a combination of two) make for a satisfying, if not complex, vape. Meaning, these can be mixed and vaped, usually as a SnV, and have given even long time mixers enjoyment. Consider adding one or two of these to your first order on top of your already researched flavor profiles you want to try. Remember, you may not like these but someone does and it’s recommended to try it.

First Order Flavors​Why DIY?:https://ift.tt/2Cb7QSk though this has been covered before, it’s still very important to know why you want to get started making your own juice. Getting into DIY ejuice is a challenge different from trying to find your first all day vape. When buying commercial juices, there are loads of resources (juicedb.com, Brick and Mortar stores, friendly vapers willing to make a suggestion, etc) for you to get a good enough guess of what brand or profile of a vape you would like. For me, my first five or six good vapes were directly recommended by my BnM store keeper who got to know what I liked and had some idea of what the juices were that had been well received. One of the advantages of knowing what you like means that you can start to recreate that for yourself using DIY concentrates. Some people are flavor chasers and like to try something new as often as possible. These types of vapers can enjoy diy more than most because they can switch up their vapes, or recipes, as often as they’d like and constantly tweak the flavors they have. And then there’s the money. And here’s the rub, when you buy a commercial juice, you’re paying as much (if not more) for the advertising/marketing as you are for the work that went into the recipe. I found there were more than a few ‘premium’ brands I just didn’t enjoy vaping (too sweet, not enough this, too much that, I wish they had used X fruit instead of Y, etc.) just as there were ones that were obscure that I just really enjoyed hitting for a month or so.So, what’s the take-away? People diy for many different reasons. If you are looking for something specific (apple fritter, milkshake, something cheap and vapable, jelly filled donuts, vanilla cigar, lemonade etc.) or if you are just in it for the exciting hobbyist adventure, you need somewhere to start. And that’s Your First Order.First Order Pitfalls/Advice: https://ift.tt/2CAs88A many of us did wasn’t the best way to start. We chose based on the name of the flavor. We chose based on what was available from one vendor or website. We chose because we wanted to make a ‘cappuccino apple banana waffle with cherries on top’ vape and got 12 different concentrates to make it and — wouldn’t you know — it came out unvapable. I can personally attest to vaping some horrendous vapes because I paid for it and I mixed it and I was going to vape through my mistakes.​Some things to remember when you first start looking at flavors:Flavors do not have to taste like their name.Flavors can and will change (that’s the good part) when mixed with other flavors, sometimes in unpredictable ways.Taste is subjective.What do each of these mean for the new mixer?Research helps in choosing which flavors to buy or to avoid (here’s looking at you TPA Honey!).Researching recipes (alltheflavors, e-liquidrecipes, etc) and finding ones that sound like a profile you enjoy, come highly rated, and aren’t too complex.Even with all this work, you may not like something!So you checked out the First Order Flavors recommendation list. You picked out some recipes that you want to try. You put all this together and drop a month’s worth of juice money on starting up (and then some) and whammo! Your juice sucks. WTF?!? A few things worth noting:Commercial juice has a fuck ton of sweetener in it. Your new mixes will have way less even if there’s some CAP Super Sweet in the recipe you used. It will take your taste buds some time to adjust.Steeping is real. Some recipes advertised as SnV (Shake and vape) really improve with some time. It will take you a bit to ‘get ahead’ and mix larger batches with confidence you will have your go to for nicotine while you are mixing to create/experiment. Patience is going to be your best friend on this journey.You just might not like something. Many of the ‘best’ recipes never really tickled my fancy. But mixing them did teach me how a flavor could be used to produce a certain result. The good news is that this here bottle of Mustard Milk that never quite did it for me might get a dash of raspberry in it or, next time, exclusively some other kind of fruit to see if I can replace the strawberry with mango lychee and Whammo! I’m off to the wide world of diy! The world is my proverbial oyster.My First Order Suggestions:Keeping all this in mind seems contradictory. So how to go about buying in when flavor is subjective and many highly rated recipes are complex or have some rare flavor in them? The over arching suggestion I give people is to start small. I think this helps on a few levels and still makes it difficult too.Let’s start with the difficulties…I still don’t know what to buy. Ok. Take a breath. Remember, taste is subjective, but the Your First Order list is going to have many flavors that are widely used in recipes. That makes them versatile so you may find them useful in a few recipes, but also you may find yourself using them in very different ways later on. So you are really just taking a chance on a flavor and that is really what makes this exciting as much as it makes it frustrating. Solution: make sure the flavors you buy first directly relate to a recipe you are going to mix. Very important.I want to buy it all. Response: you can’t. You wont. And you will go broke trying. Set a budget. Diy generally pays off in at least two months. I suggest you set aside a two month juice budget for your first order. Commit to vaping your old commercial juice when your new juices are either steeping or just not cutting it for you. If you get that “this isn’t so bad” feel from something you’ve made, then — Whammo! – you should have the diy bug by then because the price point comparison is too good to be true. But, it is! You are now on the road to $1/30ml ejuice 4lyfe and you may even start selling some at a modest cost to friends to cover buying new concentrates. Who knows?​Buying in on a Budget:You say, “Ok, sure. I’m sold on this promise of wonderful flavor, but I want to start small.” I say, “Great! This will actually increase your chances of success, despite the frustration of not having 1 zillion flavors in your arsenal to start.” You ask, “What do you mean?” Let me explain…Having a zillion flavors is a curse and a blessing. DIY is tricky because you really have to get to know your flavors. Like, all their secrets. It takes time vaping them. Mixing at different percentages. Different wattages. ARRRGHHH!!! Too many variables! Ok, settle down. Buying in on a budget is a great way to get to know your flavors while producing something vapable, but at a lower initial cost. Specifically with the initial buy in cost of pg, vg, nicotine, bottles, and a scale. Now here’s where things get tricky. Which of these can you do without? Really, none of them is it recommended to do without. But there are actually ways around them if you are on a shoestring budget, ways to offset the cost if you are on a moderate budget, and ways to really spend all your juice money for the year if you’re not careful.​Here are some money saving tips:You will want a million bottles eventually. Tip: save all your glass bottles starting now. You can wash these out and relabel them later with some masking tape. The flavor will come out. I even used some plastic bottles by only mixing new juices in them that fit the same or similar profile. Not ideal, but you’ve already bought them. Just rinse them out with warm water, let them air dry and then expect some lingering aroma in the plastics.Buy wisely. Meaning, there’s a sweet spot with your order that will get you free shipping with Nicriver, vaperstek, bullcityflavors, etc. But with nicriver, you can get your flavors and pg/vg/nic all in one shot. If you are starting small enough with flavors, then you will be fine. If you are extra patient, you can wait for a sale and save 20%. Major holidays are generally when those happen. Join their email lists.Consider taking a chance on some Stand Alone flavors.I do NOT recommend against saving money by NOT buying a scale. Measuring by weight is the easiest and very accurate way of making mixes. You want to be able to reproduce your results or avoid them if you didn’t like the results. 1%, heck, even 0.5% can make a juice go south depending on the flavor. For this reason, I recommend buying in on the scale from day 1 as well as only using flavors that are forgiving at higher percentages. A small mess up here and there will not make a huge difference in taste or quality that way.Stand Alone Flavors:Here is where the community is a massive wonderful resource. Yes, taste is subjective, but you’ve accepted the risk of trying some things and you have done your research on the flavors themselves, so here’s some links to threads where people have found that a flavor concentrate (or a combination of two) make for a satisfying, if not complex, vape. Meaning, these can be mixed and vaped, usually as a SnV, and have given even long time mixers enjoyment. Consider adding one or two of these to your first order on top of your already researched flavor profiles you want to try. Remember, you may not like these but someone does and it’s recommended to try it.

Submitted October 11, 2018 at 12:50PM by isuamadog
via reddit https://ift.tt/2CbKSdQ}

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