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Plain Wire VS Clapton – Let’s Do Some Math! https://ift.tt/2Prk3F7

I was just thinking about why a clapton coil delivers better flavor than its plain counterpart (Question 1). Keeping in mind the increased mass of clapton, I was also thinking which gauge of the wrap wire would make the most out of it (Question 2).

Utilizing Excel and Steam Engine, I came up with a table comparing the plain coil VS the claptons in different gauges.

Control factors: 0.4×1 KA1 3mm ID 5/4 wraps

Let's do something heavy. I mean, how many of you are still using this thick of a wire!?

Variable factors: wrap wires in 36 38 40 42 44 AWG SS316L

https://imgur.com/XcUUddv

The table shows the increase in mass, surface area (SA), heat capacity, and resistance. It's linear here.

The thicker the wrap wire, the more mass/SA/heat capacity/resistance.

This answers my first question very simply.

For the second question, I compare the SA-to-mass ratio (the higher, the better) as well as the heat capacity-to-SA ratio (the lower, the better). Now it is non-linear! It seems it hits the sweet spot with 40g wrap. I get the most SA per each mg of mass while it costs me the least heat capacity per each sq mm of SA. The 42g comes really close, almost no difference, with slightly less SA (boo hoo!) but at the same time less mass (yayyy!). Before making this table, I thought all the 4x would perform better than the 3x but I was wrong. The third prize goes to the 38g followed by the 44g. The 36g is the biggest looser in the clapton class.

Yes, of course, the plain is the lightest and the clapton is hungry for power to heat up all the mass. However, the 40g clapton will give you the best bang for the buck!

I expect more or less the same outcome with different core wires.

With all that said, am I making any sense here? If I am, I hope this helps. 🙂

I was just thinking about why a clapton coil delivers better flavor than its plain counterpart (Question 1). Keeping in mind the increased mass of clapton, I was also thinking which gauge of the wrap wire would make the most out of it (Question 2).​Utilizing Excel and Steam Engine, I came up with a table comparing the plain coil VS the claptons in different gauges.​Control factors: 0.4×1 KA1 3mm ID 5/4 wrapsLet’s do something heavy. I mean, how many of you are still using this thick of a wire!?​Variable factors: wrap wires in 36 38 40 42 44 AWG SS316L​https://imgur.com/XcUUddv​The table shows the increase in mass, surface area (SA), heat capacity, and resistance. It’s linear here.The thicker the wrap wire, the more mass/SA/heat capacity/resistance.This answers my first question very simply.​For the second question, I compare the SA-to-mass ratio (the higher, the better) as well as the heat capacity-to-SA ratio (the lower, the better). Now it is non-linear! It seems it hits the sweet spot with 40g wrap. I get the most SA per each mg of mass while it costs me the least heat capacity per each sq mm of SA. The 42g comes really close, almost no difference, with slightly less SA (boo hoo!) but at the same time less mass (yayyy!). Before making this table, I thought all the 4x would perform better than the 3x but I was wrong. The third prize goes to the 38g followed by the 44g. The 36g is the biggest looser in the clapton class.​Yes, of course, the plain is the lightest and the clapton is hungry for power to heat up all the mass. However, the 40g clapton will give you the best bang for the buck!​I expect more or less the same outcome with different core wires.​With all that said, am I making any sense here? If I am, I hope this helps. 🙂

Submitted December 08, 2018 at 10:39PM by WNT_W
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