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Tested: Vaporesso Luxe PM40! https://ift.tt/3pGp1kv

Starting with the TL:DR's for each section again, full explanations and stats below!

 

If you’re new to these posts, they’re all about doing a deep dive into the electrical performance of the vaping devices we use. My goal is to provide technical information which is difficult or impossible to find elsewhere. We’ll be looking at the internal cell (capacity and CDR), USB charging function, DC converter performance, standby draw, low cell cutoff, and the internal build quality (opinion) with dismantle pics. There’s a very brief section on personal usage experiences but other than that this isn’t a “review”. Feel free to ask any questions!

 

Overall, another mixed bag device performance-wise from Vaporesso – some good points some not so good points.

 

  • The internal cell is a Li-HV type which charges to 4.35V, the first mod I’ve seen to use one of these. This allows a higher mAh for the size. It didn’t quite hit the 1800mAh as claimed but close at 1751mAh as tested. CDR seems to be approx. 8-10A – performance would not be good over 30W.

 

  • The USB charge function is excellent in performance but only hits 1.5A while Vaporesso claims 2A. Full charge from dead empty is around 1.5hrs, not 1hr. It uses a better switchmode circuit (compared to a linear type) for high efficiency but still runs fairly warm (84C+).

 

  • The DC converter is a disappointment and the biggest surprise in this test – it’ll only hit 27W maximum with a full battery and the lowest fireable resistance (0.6ohm) – nowhere near the device 40W rating and not even the maximum recommended for this coil (20-30W). This will drop to 18W maximum when the cell is almost empty. The PM40 is not compatible with any of the GTX coils under 0.6ohm. The only sort-of upside here (??) is that the cell would seriously struggle being run at a set 40W anyway. But yeah, it’s basically not a 40W device.

 

  • Standby draw and low cell cutoff are both ideal, no problems there. The PM40 shouldn’t be discharging the cell while or storage or wasting power in use.

 

  • Build quality is decent, but the main cell wires are very thin. Open ingress point around the USB socket, but the board directly inside has some sealant and conformal coating for protection at least.

 

All testing graphs.

 

All dismantle pics.

 

Full explanations below.


 

Intro:

 

The Luxe PM40 is Vaporesso’s new pod device – It’s kinda like a small proper regulated mod but with a pod on top, a hybrid perhaps? I believe this model is being put in for PMTA approval which is great to see.

 

Quick Specs (claimed):

 

  • 40W max output
  • 1800mAh battery
  • 2A USB-C charging
  • 4ml liquid capacity (2ml TPD)
  • Uses the GTX line of coils, 0.6 and 0.8ohm included (20-30W and 12-20W respectively)
  • Adjustable airflow

 

Just quickly on my own thoughts as far as usage goes, I absolutely love the idea of a pod with much higher battery and liquid capacity than the standard Caliburn types. I’m a super lazy vaper at heart and the less charging and refilling I have to do, the better. What didn’t quite gel with me though was that the coil and airflow combination gave an experience somewhere in between my preferred zones of MTL and DL. I couldn’t close it down enough for a proper MTL but it also doesn’t provide enough oomph for a solid DL hit. I struggled a bit to find the correct strength liquid to use, I think I ended up mixing between 6-9mg. I’d like to try the 1.2 coils and see if they give a better MTL experience. YMMV obviously, we all vape in different ways and this might be right up your alley. Other than that I got along with it just fine – love the clear pod, fill method is great (gotta get used to the force required to pop the cap), and although the wattage adjustment is a little more clunky with a single button it didn’t really bother me. If Vaporesso could make a proper tight draw MTL version of the pod and coils for this device, I’d be a happy camper.

 

This device was sent to me by Vaporesso, thank you!

 


 

Internal Cell:

 

The first time I’ve seen this in a mod – the PM40 uses a Li-HV type of cell which has a higher nominal voltage of 3.8V and charges to 4.35V. Conventional LiPo cells are 3.7/4.2V. The higher voltage enables a higher energy density basically; 1800mAh is an impressive rating for such a small cell. Two tests are shown here – a standard capacity check at a C/5 rate and a power run at around the maximum current the board can draw. Both tests were done on the West Mountain Radio CBA-IV.

 

Cell test graph here.

 

Capacity came in a little low at 1751mAh / 6.77Wh. The cell is printed as a 6.84Wh (1800mAh @ 3.8V nominal) model so I’d say Vaporesso hasn’t falsely rated this device, but it really should be able to hit that number or a margin above. Since this won’t be the lowest performing battery, the cell manufacturer should have specified this model as a 1700mAh.

 

For the power run, I chose a rate of 10A – slightly above the maximum I could get the board to draw. It’s clearly not a high current cell – showing significant voltage drop and reaching 73.7C at the end of the run with this load. I think a 8-10A CDR would be a fair rating for this cell. Because of this, it’s a good thing the mod doesn’t actually put out the full 40W as claimed – cell performance would be pretty terrible at that level.

 

Overall considering this cell is being used in a max 27W output device (see next section), I’d say it’s adequate for that purpose.

 


 

DC Converter:

Here we’re looking to see the maximum output voltage / current / wattage, and efficiency. These tests were done on a purpose built home made Arduino data acquisition rig.

 

Well then… this is not great.

 

Wattage test data and graphs here.

 

The DC converter in the PM40 is not capable of boost operation, meaning it can’t output a voltage to the coil higher than the battery voltage. Why does this matter? With its single cell under load at the best case scenario of being fully charged, you’re looking at a maximum of around 4-4.25V depending on the wattage setting. With the 0.6ohm coil (20-30W recommended), the most you’ll get is approximately 27W. Around 23W with the 0.8. With an almost empty battery, this will drop way down to around 18W on the 0.6ohm coil, not even the minimum recommended setting, and will be obviously lower again on the 0.8ohm coil. If you were to set 27W or above on this mod, it will in effect operate like a mech mod – the wattage will continuously drop with the battery charge level.

 

The pods are compatible with the GTX series of coils, but the PM40 won’t fire anything below 0.6ohm so you won’t be able to use the lower resistance models. Basically, there’s no possible way to get more than 27W from the device no matter what coil or wattage setting you use. The converter might be technically capable of hitting 40W with that output voltage if it could fire a lower resistance coil, but it’s literally impossible to get it to do so in use as it won’t. Pretty disappointing to see a 40W labelled device not be able to put out anywhere near the advertised level.

 

The efficiency of the converter in the PM40 is definitely on the low end compared to other devices. It didn’t quite hit 80% at any wattage and coil combination, usually lower.

 

  • Maximum Output Voltage: Equivalent to battery level under load, from approximately 4.25V down

  • Maximum Output Current: ~7A

  • Maximum Output Wattage: ~27W / 0.6ohm coil, ~23W / 0.8ohm coil

  • Efficiency: 60-80%

  • Minimum firing resistance ~0.6ohm

 

Note that the converter output is quite noisy and variable – scope shot. Although it doesn’t look like the device cannot boost above the battery voltage, you’ll see a few results in the data table showing the output slightly higher than the battery (it’s probably not) – this could have been caused by some issues with the way the Arduino rig was recording the voltage and current numbers in relation to the noisy output (it does averaging of the readings) or some other converter factor. Just know that there’s some margin of error in this data, likely favouring the mod though.

 


 

Charging Performance:

 

Logged charge cycle here.

 

Full run datalog.

 

Very, very good performance here, it looks basically perfect. The PM40 uses a more expensive and efficient switchmode converter in the charging section. The constant current and constant voltage phases are very well regulated, the maximum cell voltage is dead on at 4.352V, it has a proper cutoff at ~10% of initial to zero and doesn’t have any parasitic draw after the cycle. Great stuff.

 

It charges with a very healthy 1.4-1.5A, although note that this isn’t the 2A as claimed. A 1.4A rate I think is plenty enough and will be easier on the cell than a 2A rate, but it’s not as advertised. A full charge takes around 1.5hrs, also not the 60mins as claimed. Obvious points off here for the fudged ratings. Note that the USB supply used for testing has been verified at 8A capable – I’m confident the charge currents were not limited by the supply.

 

Interestingly, Vaporesso has chosen to locate the charge circuit on a separate board in the bottom of the device. Pic here. It has a direct connection to the cell and 4 thin wire connections back to the main board – this indicates the PM40 should be capable of firmware updates as I assume these are USB data and power lines.

 

At steady state while charging I measured 83.9C at the inductor and 81.4C inside the sealant material – pic here where I assume the active components are. Around 85C is fine for the inductor as these can handle a fairly high temperature, 81C is getting high for the actives considering I’m sure I’m not measuring the hottest part due to the protective sealant and the board being out in the open instead of inside the mod. It could easily be +10C on the MOSFET die in use. The high efficiency of the switchmode type charge circuit (83-91%) helps it to not generate a whole lot of heat to begin with but it would be better if this was used to enable lower temperatures of say 70C for better component life and reliability.

 

  • Maximum cell voltage: 4.352V

  • Maximum cell current: 1.482A

  • Maximum USB current: 1.482A

  • Cutoff: Full cutoff @~10% of initial rate (good)

  • Standby draw after cycle / top ups: No (good)

  • Efficiency: 83-92% (excellent!)

  • Charging temperature: 83.9C (board outside of case, will be higher inside a mod in use)

 


 

Internal build quality / disassembly:

 

Overall it’s not bad. The PM40 separates out the DC converter / microcontroller board (top, near the pod) from the charging circuit (bottom of device). It’s nice to have the heat generating charge circuit away from the main board, but this means 4 thin wires from the USB socket and a main positive cell wire have to run the length of the device. Generally I think the less wires and connections the better – these have to be hand soldered. The main positive and negative cell wires are super thin (like smaller than 22ga), I’d say undersized for the 10A the device can draw. At a 7.3A draw I measured 69mV drop collectively – this would be close to 100mV (0.1V) if you’re running the device at the maximum 27W. That’s a significant amount when the cell full to flat range is around 1V.

 

It has a rubber seal on top of the top board assembly to protect from liquid leaking down into the circuitry which is good, but be aware there’s a gap in between the USB socket and case which would be easily vulnerable to liquid etc ingress in this area. There does appear to be some conformal coating on the charge board and a glob of sealant material applied, both of these should help – pic here. Good to see that the USB-C socket is well affixed to the board – it lies flat against it and has 4 attachment points.

 


 

Low Cell Cutoff, Standby Current:

 

While the screen is on, the PM40 draws around 37mA. As soon as the screen turns off it drops into full low current standby mode – a super low 16.7uA. This is perfect – negligible battery power is being wasted when the device is not being used, and the board won’t be discharging the cell in storage. This is very important for internal cell devices. Top marks.

 

Watching the cell voltage while firing, the PM40 called it quits when the resting cell level was at 3.30V or below. Throttling occurred at around the 3.0V mark. These levels are fine and seem to be the average cutoffs in devices with LiPo cells.

 

  • Standby draw (screen on): 37mA

  • Standby draw (screen off): 16.7uA

  • Low cell cutoff: 3.30V approx resting, 3.0V under load

 


Cheers!

 

~VMG

 

IMPORTANT NOTE / DISCLAIMER!! All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy HOWEVER no claims are made that these numbers, opinions or results are 100% correct – mistakes may have been made. Your safety is your responsibility! It is always good practice to monitor any charging system (placed on a non-flammable surface) and unplug shortly after full charge. This information refers to the tested operation alone in a properly working device – it is impossible to give an estimation of reliability or outcome in the event of a faulty device.

Starting with the TL:DR’s for each section again, full explanations and stats below! If you’re new to these posts, they’re all about doing a deep dive into the electrical performance of the vaping devices we use. My goal is to provide technical information which is difficult or impossible to find elsewhere. We’ll be looking at the internal cell (capacity and CDR), USB charging function, DC converter performance, standby draw, low cell cutoff, and the internal build quality (opinion) with dismantle pics. There’s a very brief section on personal usage experiences but other than that this isn’t a “review”. Feel free to ask any questions! Overall, another mixed bag device performance-wise from Vaporesso – some good points some not so good points. The internal cell is a Li-HV type which charges to 4.35V, the first mod I’ve seen to use one of these. This allows a higher mAh for the size. It didn’t quite hit the 1800mAh as claimed but close at 1751mAh as tested. CDR seems to be approx. 8-10A – performance would not be good over 30W. The USB charge function is excellent in performance but only hits 1.5A while Vaporesso claims 2A. Full charge from dead empty is around 1.5hrs, not 1hr. It uses a better switchmode circuit (compared to a linear type) for high efficiency but still runs fairly warm (84C+). The DC converter is a disappointment and the biggest surprise in this test – it’ll only hit 27W maximum with a full battery and the lowest fireable resistance (0.6ohm) – nowhere near the device 40W rating and not even the maximum recommended for this coil (20-30W). This will drop to 18W maximum when the cell is almost empty. The PM40 is not compatible with any of the GTX coils under 0.6ohm. The only sort-of upside here (??) is that the cell would seriously struggle being run at a set 40W anyway. But yeah, it’s basically not a 40W device. Standby draw and low cell cutoff are both ideal, no problems there. The PM40 shouldn’t be discharging the cell while or storage or wasting power in use. Build quality is decent, but the main cell wires are very thin. Open ingress point around the USB socket, but the board directly inside has some sealant and conformal coating for protection at least. All testing graphs. All dismantle pics. Full explanations below. Intro: The Luxe PM40 is Vaporesso’s new pod device – It’s kinda like a small proper regulated mod but with a pod on top, a hybrid perhaps? I believe this model is being put in for PMTA approval which is great to see. Quick Specs (claimed): 40W max output1800mAh battery2A USB-C charging4ml liquid capacity (2ml TPD)Uses the GTX line of coils, 0.6 and 0.8ohm included (20-30W and 12-20W respectively)Adjustable airflow Just quickly on my own thoughts as far as usage goes, I absolutely love the idea of a pod with much higher battery and liquid capacity than the standard Caliburn types. I’m a super lazy vaper at heart and the less charging and refilling I have to do, the better. What didn’t quite gel with me though was that the coil and airflow combination gave an experience somewhere in between my preferred zones of MTL and DL. I couldn’t close it down enough for a proper MTL but it also doesn’t provide enough oomph for a solid DL hit. I struggled a bit to find the correct strength liquid to use, I think I ended up mixing between 6-9mg. I’d like to try the 1.2 coils and see if they give a better MTL experience. YMMV obviously, we all vape in different ways and this might be right up your alley. Other than that I got along with it just fine – love the clear pod, fill method is great (gotta get used to the force required to pop the cap), and although the wattage adjustment is a little more clunky with a single button it didn’t really bother me. If Vaporesso could make a proper tight draw MTL version of the pod and coils for this device, I’d be a happy camper. This device was sent to me by Vaporesso, thank you!  Internal Cell: The first time I’ve seen this in a mod – the PM40 uses a Li-HV type of cell which has a higher nominal voltage of 3.8V and charges to 4.35V. Conventional LiPo cells are 3.7/4.2V. The higher voltage enables a higher energy density basically; 1800mAh is an impressive rating for such a small cell. Two tests are shown here – a standard capacity check at a C/5 rate and a power run at around the maximum current the board can draw. Both tests were done on the West Mountain Radio CBA-IV. Cell test graph here. Capacity came in a little low at 1751mAh / 6.77Wh. The cell is printed as a 6.84Wh (1800mAh @ 3.8V nominal) model so I’d say Vaporesso hasn’t falsely rated this device, but it really should be able to hit that number or a margin above. Since this won’t be the lowest performing battery, the cell manufacturer should have specified this model as a 1700mAh. For the power run, I chose a rate of 10A – slightly above the maximum I could get the board to draw. It’s clearly not a high current cell – showing significant voltage drop and reaching 73.7C at the end of the run with this load. I think a 8-10A CDR would be a fair rating for this cell. Because of this, it’s a good thing the mod doesn’t actually put out the full 40W as claimed – cell performance would be pretty terrible at that level. Overall considering this cell is being used in a max 27W output device (see next section), I’d say it’s adequate for that purpose.  DC Converter:Here we’re looking to see the maximum output voltage / current / wattage, and efficiency. These tests were done on a purpose built home made Arduino data acquisition rig. Well then… this is not great. Wattage test data and graphs here. The DC converter in the PM40 is not capable of boost operation, meaning it can’t output a voltage to the coil higher than the battery voltage. Why does this matter? With its single cell under load at the best case scenario of being fully charged, you’re looking at a maximum of around 4-4.25V depending on the wattage setting. With the 0.6ohm coil (20-30W recommended), the most you’ll get is approximately 27W. Around 23W with the 0.8. With an almost empty battery, this will drop way down to around 18W on the 0.6ohm coil, not even the minimum recommended setting, and will be obviously lower again on the 0.8ohm coil. If you were to set 27W or above on this mod, it will in effect operate like a mech mod – the wattage will continuously drop with the battery charge level. The pods are compatible with the GTX series of coils, but the PM40 won’t fire anything below 0.6ohm so you won’t be able to use the lower resistance models. Basically, there’s no possible way to get more than 27W from the device no matter what coil or wattage setting you use. The converter might be technically capable of hitting 40W with that output voltage if it could fire a lower resistance coil, but it’s literally impossible to get it to do so in use as it won’t. Pretty disappointing to see a 40W labelled device not be able to put out anywhere near the advertised level. The efficiency of the converter in the PM40 is definitely on the low end compared to other devices. It didn’t quite hit 80% at any wattage and coil combination, usually lower. Maximum Output Voltage: Equivalent to battery level under load, from approximately 4.25V downMaximum Output Current: ~7AMaximum Output Wattage: ~27W / 0.6ohm coil, ~23W / 0.8ohm coilEfficiency: 60-80%Minimum firing resistance ~0.6ohm Note that the converter output is quite noisy and variable – scope shot. Although it doesn’t look like the device cannot boost above the battery voltage, you’ll see a few results in the data table showing the output slightly higher than the battery (it’s probably not) – this could have been caused by some issues with the way the Arduino rig was recording the voltage and current numbers in relation to the noisy output (it does averaging of the readings) or some other converter factor. Just know that there’s some margin of error in this data, likely favouring the mod though.  Charging Performance: Logged charge cycle here. Full run datalog. Very, very good performance here, it looks basically perfect. The PM40 uses a more expensive and efficient switchmode converter in the charging section. The constant current and constant voltage phases are very well regulated, the maximum cell voltage is dead on at 4.352V, it has a proper cutoff at ~10% of initial to zero and doesn’t have any parasitic draw after the cycle. Great stuff. It charges with a very healthy 1.4-1.5A, although note that this isn’t the 2A as claimed. A 1.4A rate I think is plenty enough and will be easier on the cell than a 2A rate, but it’s not as advertised. A full charge takes around 1.5hrs, also not the 60mins as claimed. Obvious points off here for the fudged ratings. Note that the USB supply used for testing has been verified at 8A capable – I’m confident the charge currents were not limited by the supply. Interestingly, Vaporesso has chosen to locate the charge circuit on a separate board in the bottom of the device. Pic here. It has a direct connection to the cell and 4 thin wire connections back to the main board – this indicates the PM40 should be capable of firmware updates as I assume these are USB data and power lines. At steady state while charging I measured 83.9C at the inductor and 81.4C inside the sealant material – pic here where I assume the active components are. Around 85C is fine for the inductor as these can handle a fairly high temperature, 81C is getting high for the actives considering I’m sure I’m not measuring the hottest part due to the protective sealant and the board being out in the open instead of inside the mod. It could easily be +10C on the MOSFET die in use. The high efficiency of the switchmode type charge circuit (83-91%) helps it to not generate a whole lot of heat to begin with but it would be better if this was used to enable lower temperatures of say 70C for better component life and reliability. Maximum cell voltage: 4.352VMaximum cell current: 1.482AMaximum USB current: 1.482ACutoff: Full cutoff @~10% of initial rate (good)Standby draw after cycle / top ups: No (good)Efficiency: 83-92% (excellent!)Charging temperature: 83.9C (board outside of case, will be higher inside a mod in use)  Internal build quality / disassembly: Overall it’s not bad. The PM40 separates out the DC converter / microcontroller board (top, near the pod) from the charging circuit (bottom of device). It’s nice to have the heat generating charge circuit away from the main board, but this means 4 thin wires from the USB socket and a main positive cell wire have to run the length of the device. Generally I think the less wires and connections the better – these have to be hand soldered. The main positive and negative cell wires are super thin (like smaller than 22ga), I’d say undersized for the 10A the device can draw. At a 7.3A draw I measured 69mV drop collectively – this would be close to 100mV (0.1V) if you’re running the device at the maximum 27W. That’s a significant amount when the cell full to flat range is around 1V. It has a rubber seal on top of the top board assembly to protect from liquid leaking down into the circuitry which is good, but be aware there’s a gap in between the USB socket and case which would be easily vulnerable to liquid etc ingress in this area. There does appear to be some conformal coating on the charge board and a glob of sealant material applied, both of these should help – pic here. Good to see that the USB-C socket is well affixed to the board – it lies flat against it and has 4 attachment points.  Low Cell Cutoff, Standby Current: While the screen is on, the PM40 draws around 37mA. As soon as the screen turns off it drops into full low current standby mode – a super low 16.7uA. This is perfect – negligible battery power is being wasted when the device is not being used, and the board won’t be discharging the cell in storage. This is very important for internal cell devices. Top marks. Watching the cell voltage while firing, the PM40 called it quits when the resting cell level was at 3.30V or below. Throttling occurred at around the 3.0V mark. These levels are fine and seem to be the average cutoffs in devices with LiPo cells. Standby draw (screen on): 37mAStandby draw (screen off): 16.7uALow cell cutoff: 3.30V approx resting, 3.0V under load Cheers! ~VMG IMPORTANT NOTE / DISCLAIMER!! All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy HOWEVER no claims are made that these numbers, opinions or results are 100% correct – mistakes may have been made. Your safety is your responsibility! It is always good practice to monitor any charging system (placed on a non-flammable surface) and unplug shortly after full charge. This information refers to the tested operation alone in a properly working device – it is impossible to give an estimation of reliability or outcome in the event of a faulty device.

Submitted February 02, 2021 at 02:26PM by VapeyMcGyver
via reddit https://ift.tt/3oFPkpH}

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